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Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Medieval and Early Modern Jurists

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Report No. r089

Bartholomaeus Caepolla

1420–1475

 

Alternative Names

Cipolla; Bartolomeo (LC); Bartolomeo Cipolla; Bartolomeo Cepola; Bartolomeo Cevola; Bartolomeo da Verona; Bartholomaeus Cepolla; Bartholomaeus Zevola; Bartolomeo Zevola

 

Biography/Description

B. was born in Verona, c. 1420, into a wealthy patrician family, the son of Michele and Caterina Giuliari. His paternal grandfather, Giovanni, had been an influential judge; his father was a silk merchant. B. first studied law at Bologna, where he was taught by the civilians Florianus a Sancto Petro and Angelus de Gambiglionibus, and the canonist Johannes de Anania. He then moved to Padova, where he studied under Paulus de Castro, Franciscus Capilistius, and Jacobus Alvarottus. Here he completed his doctorate in utroque on 21 April 1445, sponsored by Antonius de Rosellis and others for canon law and by Daniel Doctoris and others for civil law.

Immediately after his graduation, B. was enrolled in the college of judges and lawyers of Verona. In 1446, the bishop of Padova, Pietro Donato, asked B. to comment publicly on the De aedilicio edicto (Dig. 21.1). He was summoned in 1449–1450 to teach in Ferrara, but his position there was either terminated early or never began. Instead, B. is found at Verona in 1450 drafting a new edition of the city’s statutes. He remained there for several years, serving in various legal and civic roles.

In 1457, B. resumed teaching, first privately in Verona. A repetitio on De fugitivis servis (C. 6.1.3) survives from this period. In 1458, he was appointed an ordinary professor (in the first morning chair) of canon law at Padova. In 1460, he began to read extraordinarie (during the afternoon) in civil law. In the following year he obtained a chair in civil law, which he held until his death. During this time, B. had a well-known dispute with his colleague in civil law, Alexander Tartagnus, about academic rank. He taught only civil law after 1470.

While continuing his legal activities and teaching duties in Padova, B. was also appointed a consistorial advocate in the Roman Curia. He was made a palatine count and a knight by Frederick III in 1469. These titles were confirmed, and the titles of “count palatine cum armis,” “counselor,” and “family member of the emperor” were added on 24 July 1471, when B. participated in the Diet of Regensburg as a member of the Venetian delegation. B. then returned to Padova and to teaching. He fell ill in March of 1475 and left teaching, dying in May of that year. He was buried in the church of S. Orsola in Padova.

B. married Marta Verità of Verona, with whom he had five sons (Michele, Leonardo, Giovanni, Ludovico, and Girolamo). She died in Padova sometime after 1459. B. remarried on 12 February 1470; his new wife was Orsolina Calza (daughter of the jurist Ludovicus) of Padova, with whom he had three daughters (Paola, Contessa, and Bartolomea).

B’s best-known works are his treatises, De servitutibus urbanorum praediorum and De servitutibus rusticorum praediorum, which were based on courses he taught at Padova on praedial servitudes in 1460–1461. These were first published in 1473–1474 in Roma and Perugia and then republished many times into the eighteenth century; they were also translated into German in the 16th century and into Italian in the 18th. P. Liver ventured that they were the “meistgedruckte juristische Monographie” from the 15th until the 19th centuries. The two treatises, always published together as if they were a single work, were a model for contemporary jurists; they provide a comprehensive picture of the subject and present solutions to practical problems. As G. Rossi notes, these treatises fruitfully integrate the academic and the practical; B. was closely linked to the traditions of the ius commune, uninterested in the novel humanistic approaches.

B’s printed works are less defined by his teaching than were those of some of his contemporaries. There is more of this sort of work in manuscript. Only B’s Commentaria on De verborum significatione (Dig. 50.16) (Lyon 1551) and the Repetitio in Codicem De fugitivis servis, 1. Si fugitivi (Brescia 1490) were printed as separate works, though the so-called Opera omnia (Lyon 1577–1578) contains a more generous selection.

B. had, however, a rich and varied production outside of the strictly academic. His numerous consilia relating to the various institutions of civil law are particularly notable. A collection of 80 of them about criminal law was published at Brescia in 1490 with a table by his sons, Michele and Leonardo. It saw considerable publishing success due to the novelty of B’s approach. He focused on the practice of criminal law, a topic hitherto neglected by academic lawyers. A printed collection of his consilia about civil law was not published until 1533, and saw fewer editions than those about criminal law. Many of B’s consilia remain in manuscript. B. also edited the Consilia of Paulus de Castro (Venezia 1475).

Equally important is a collection of B’s cautelae on the various fields of law, especially as practiced in court. They suggested methods for achieving legal goals that were arguably prohibited by the law – but without technically violating the law. This collection was written in two parts (in 1459 and 1472) and is found in several manuscripts and in print; the first edition appeared in Perugia in 1473–1474. The collection remained popular until the middle of the seventeenth century.

The treatise De interpretatione legis extensiva (written in 1469, 1st ed. Venezia 1557) is a major work. It aims to focus on the character of, and limits to, the interpretative work of the jurist. G. Rossi offers an in-depth analysis and discussion of this work and concludes that B. was able to adhere to the tradition while at the same time affirming and expanding the freedom of interpretation of the doctor iuris.

A second, shorter treatise of B’s appeared in 1460, dedicated to Ermolao Barbaro, bishop of Verona: Tractatus de contractibus simulatis or De contractibus emptionum et locationum cum pacto de retrovertendo simulatis (1st ed. Roma 1474, also in TUI 1584). It was concerned with the detection and disguising of usury.

B. displays originality in his treatise De imperatore militum deligendo (c. 1454, 1st ed., Roma 1474, and thereafter often found in various publications De re militari in conjunction with the Tractatus of Paris de Puteo, e.g., TUI 1584). This text was in the nature of a long consilium dedicated to clarifying the legal terms of a dispute between two famous captains, Gentile della Leonessa and Bartolomeo Colleoni. It examines the qualifications necessary to become commander in chief of the Venetian armies. B. concluded that Venezia could entrust military command on the basis of a political evaluation of the merits and titles of the claimants that could not be questioned so long as the proper form was followed.

B. was less productive and influential in the field of canon law. A repetitio De testamentis et ultimis voluntatibus (X 3.26), survives in manuscript. A Tractatus de cognitione librorum iuris canonici (published, seemingly for the first time in Tractatus (Lyon 1549), also in TUI 1584) displays an interest in the external history of canon law. Equally lacking is an attention to feudal law. B’s only known works on the subject are a Lectura feudorum and a repetitio De feudi cognitione held in Padova in 1469, both of which survive only in manuscript.

A few non-juristic works survive. The Libellus de dolore tolerando (1466–1467), dedicated to the cardinal Juan de Carvajal, papal legate to Venezia, attempts to persuade the cardinal to intercede with Pope Paul II to prevent B. ending his life in disgrace. (The details of this story are unfortunately unknown.) There is also a poem addressed to Emperor Frederick III urging him to take up arms against the Turks and a little treatise, in manuscript, entitled De vita ac modo vivendi in Studio which was composed in Bologna in 1442.

B’s death at a fairly young age and apparently quite suddenly probably accounts for the somewhat disheveled state of the survival of his works both in manuscript and in early printed editions. Our descriptions of the manuscripts are based, to a considerable extent, on G. Dolezalek’s Manuscripta juridica, who, in turn, relied on printed catalogues, some quite old. Our examination of some of the manuscripts that are available online or of more recent catalogues has led to a number of corrections. More will surely follow. We have included among the early printed editions all the incunabula that have GW numbers. We have also included some to which we have found references to incunabula outside of GW. We are suspicious of these references but include them for the sake of completeness. References to printings after 1500 are highly selective. The so-called Opera omnia of 1577–1578 does, however, contain a considerable amount of B’s ‘academic’ work that the printers of incunabula missed. What we have found so far both in manuscript and in print suggests that more of B’s ‘academic’ work survives than G. Rossi knew about.

Source: G. Rossi in DGI 1.547–549, rev CD et al

TUI database

 

Text(s)

 
No. 01_0

Lecturae.

 
No. 01_1

Lectura feudorum, ?1469. The temptation to think of this item as being connected with, if not the same thing as, Text 03_3 is strong.

 
No. 01_2

Lectura in Codicem, 1446 X 1475. There are three manuscript witnesses. In one the catalogue indicates that it is confined to book 2. The second contains Cod. 7.26 through Cod. 7.43.8, and is clearly incomplete. The third contains a substantial portion of Cod. 6. All may be a reworkings of the Lectura in Codicem of Paulus de Castro. More work with the manuscripts is called for. See also Text 09_5.

 
No. 01_3

Lectura in Digestum, 1446 X 1475.

 
No. 02_0

Commentaria. Although there are various ways to distinguish commentaria from lecturae and repetitiones, the distinctions among them are not sharp.

 
No. 02_1

Ad tit. De aedilicio edicto (Dig. 21.1), 1446. See the Biography.

 
No. 02_2

Ad tit. De verborum significatione (D.50.16), 1446 X 1475. No manuscript has yet been found, and the first printed edition did not appear until 75 years after B’s death.

 
No. 03_0

Repetitiones. As the Biography notes, there are relatively few of these in comparison with some of B’s academic contemporaries.

 
No. 03_1

In C. De fugitivis servis, Si fugitivi (C. 6.1.3), 1457.

 
No. 03_2

In Liber extra, De testamentis et ultimis voluntatibus (X 3.26). This text enjoyed some printing success. It may be the equivalent of Text 09_4.

 
No. 03_3

In De feudi cognitione (L.F. 2.1), 1469. The temptation to think of this text as connected Text 01_1, if not the same, is strong.

 
No. 03_4

In C. De confessis, Confessus (Cod. 7.59.1), 1446 X 1475.

 
No. 04

Cautelae advocatorum or Tractatus de cautelis. As noted in the Biography, this work was written in two parts. Some of the manuscripts contain only the first part; at least one contains both parts; some require further examination. While we have preserved the traditional distinction between the two parts, it may be better to think of this text as one on which B. continued to work for some period of time. It is also possible that some of the versions that appear in early printed editions have been expanded by authors other than B.

 
No. 04_1

Part 1, 1459.

 
No. 04_2

Parts 1 and 2, 1459 and 1472.

 
No. 04_3

Contents uncertain, 1459 X 1472.

 
No. 05

Consilia, 1446 X 1475. There are quite a few of these in manuscript only. The printed editions, which begin shortly after B’s death, distinguish between those rendered in criminal cases and those rendered in non-criminal cases. That distinction does not seem to appear in the manuscripts, but analysis of the manuscripts has just begun.

 
No. 06

Consiliorum Pauli de Castro editio, 1446 X 1475. Noted in the Biography. B’s contribution to the printed edition is unclear. One is tempted to think that he composed the repertorium, or that the printer put together the repertorium on the basis of B’s annotations in his copy of his teacher’s consilia.

 
No. 07

Tractatus, 1446 X 1475. See also 09, below.

 
No. 07_01

De servitutibus urbanorum praediorum, 1460–1461. This and the following work usually appear together both in manuscript and in print, but they bear separate titles.

 
No. 07_02

De servitutibus rusticorum praediorum, 1460–1461.

 
No. 07_03

De contractibus simulatis, 1460. Also known as De contractibus emptionum et locationum cum pacto de retrovertendo simulatis.

 
No. 07_04

De interpretatione legis extensiva, 1469. See the Biography.

 
No. 07_05

De cognitione librorum iuris canonici, before 1468. The date comes from the colophon of one the manuscripts. The dedicatee is probably Nicolò Donà (Donato, Donati) (1434–1497).

 
No. 07_06

De imperatore militum deligendo, c. 1454. See the Biography.

 
No. 08

Non-juridical works.

 
No. 08_01

Libellus de dolore tolerando, 1466–1467. See the Biography.

 
No. 08_02

Verses addressed to Frederick III, 1446 X 1475. See the Biography.

 
No. 08_03

De vita ac modo vivendi in Studio, 1442. See the Biography. Said to be in manuscript, but we have so far not found a citation to the manuscript.

 
No. 09_0

Dubia. With the exception of Text 09_6, the following items are evidenced by one citation in a manuscript catalogue. Only Text 09_5 is in print; none is discussed in any of the literature about B. that we have examined. Where the manuscript is available online, we have identified the items in question and placed them in the appropriate places above. Where it is not, we suspect that the catalogue contains a misdescription of a known work of B’s and suggest in the manuscript description what that work might be.

 
No. 09_1

De praescriptionibus.

 
No. 09_2

De praesumptionibus.

 
No. 09_3

Ordo iudiciarius.

 
No. 09_4

Tractatus de testamentis.

 
No. 09_5

Tractatus de usucapione.

 
No. 09_6

Tractatus (without further description).

 
No. 10

Opera omnia, 1446 X 1475. The name given to an early print that is described below under Early Editions.

 

Text(s) – Manuscripts

No. 01_1

Lectura feudorum, ?1469.

 
Manuscript

Erlangen, Universitätsbibl. 600, fol. 1–7v

 
No. 01_2

Lectura in Codicem, 1446 X 1475.

 
Manuscript

Bologna, Coll. Spagna 237 (item 2) (Catalogue indicates that it is confined to book 2.)

 
 

München, BSB Clm 6585, fol. 225r–280r (Online. Incipit: “Jacobus de cripola de verona utriusque iuris doctor et nunc ordinarius iuris civilis universitatis paduane ad rub. De usucapione pro emptore vel transactione [Cod. 7.26].” Ends with the authentic Qui semel, which follows Cod. 7.43.8 in the Vulgate. Looks as if it ends in mid-sentence. There being no known Jacobus de Cripola, the identification with B. seems likely. May be a reworking of the lectura of Paulus de Castro, whose lectura on Cod. 6 occupies more than 200 folios at the beginning of the manuscript.)

 
 

München, BSB Clm 14195 (Online. A reportatio rather than a ‘published’ lectura, covering Cod. 6.1 through 6.61. How close it is to the lectura of Paulus de Castro in BSB, Clm 6585 requires exploration.)

 
No. 01_3

Lectura in Digestum, 1446 X 1475.

 
Manuscript

München, BSB Clm 14195 (Online. A reportatio rather than a ‘published’ lectura, covering Dig. 24.3 through 28.5 from the Infortiatum.)

 
 

München, BSB Clm 14195 (Online. A reportatio rather than a ‘published’ lectura, covering Dig. 43.1 through 43.16 from the Digestum novum.)

 
No. 02_1

Ad tit. De aedilicio edicto (Dig. 21.1), 1446.

 
Manuscript

München, BSB Clm 6670, fol. 101[–196] (Dolezalek classifies as a repetitio rather than as a commentarium. Dolezalek’s brackets in foliation seem to mean that he estimated the end folio on the basis of the beginning of the next item in the catalogue.)

 
No. 03_2

In Liber extra, De testamentis et ultimis voluntatibus (X 3.26).

 
Manuscript

London, BL Arundel 421

 
No. 03_3

In De feudi cognitione (L.F. 2.1), 1469.

 
Manuscript

München, BSB Clm 5357 , fol. 145[–156] (Dolezalek classifies as a tractatus rather than as a repetitio.)

 
 

Padova, Bibl. Univ. n. provv. 275 (Dolezalek classifies as a tractatus rather than as a repetitio. Incipit: “Quia istud capitulum est multum solemne” Explicit: “locato de extra Potuit.”)

 
No. 03_4

In C. De confessis, Confessus (Cod. 7.59.1), 1446 X 1475.

 
Manuscript

Wien, ÖNB Cvpl. 5056, fol. 187r–189r (Incipit: “In glosa rubrice dic melius ultra.” Explicit: “de fide instrumentorum etc.”)

 
No. 04

Cautelae advocatorum or Tractatus de cautelis.

 
Manuscript

Ravenna, Bibl. Classense 450, fol. 375r–381v (A large collection of consilia, most of which are by Franciscus de Alvarottis, whose student Jacobus Ruberius (Parmensis) compiled this manuscript in 1477–1478 in Padova.)

 
No. 04_3

Contents uncertain, 1459 X 1472.

 
Manuscript

Verona, BC 939, fol. 1r (Noted by G. Rossi in DGI.)

 
 

Nürnberg, Stadtbibl. Cent.VI.7, fol. 155r–226v

 
No. 05

Consilia, 1446 X 1475.

 
Manuscript

Verona, BC 2895 (Formerly 10.9.360. Contains the drafts in what seems to be B’s handwriting, with many revisions, of 34 consilia given in 1465.)

 
 

Verona, BC 2195 (A single consilium of B’s concerning a lease by one Marcus Mantovanus.)

 
 

Venezia, BN lat. 2324 fol. 48r–52v, 57r–59r, 338v–341r, 356v–365r (Also known as lat. V.2. A large collection of consilia, in which B’s play a relatively minor role.)

 
 

Ravenna, Bibl. Classense 485, fol. 186v–187v, 234r–236v (Vol. IV. A large collection in 10 volumes, mostly of consilia, in which B’s play a relatively minor role.)

 
No. 07_01

De servitutibus urbanorum praediorum, 1460–1461.

 
Manuscript

Napoli, BN III.A.8 (item 3) (Catalogued as “Tractatus de servitutibus”, it probably contains both tractatus.)

 
 

Modena, Bibl. Estense a.W.3,8 – lat.382 (at front) (Catalogued as “Tractatus de servitutibus rusticis et urbanis.” Incipit: “Qui alicuius artis.” The text likely differs from the standard. It was written by a student who attended B’s lectures on the topic in Padova in 1461–1467.)

 
No. 07_02

De servitutibus rusticorum praediorum, 1460–1461.

 
Manuscript

Napoli, BN III.A.8 (item 3) (Catalogued as “Tractatus de servitutibus”, it probably contains both tractatus.)

 
 

Modena, Bibl. Estense a.W.3,8 – lat.382 (at front) (Catalogued as “Tractatus de servitutibus rusticis et urbanis.” Incipit: “Qui alicuius artis.” The text likely differs from the standard. It was written by a student who attended B’s lectures on the topic in Padova in 1461–1467.)

 
 

Freiburg im Breisgau, Universitätsbibl. 233, fol. 201r–295v (Incipit: “Seruitutes rusticorum prediorum sunt hee: Iter, actus, uia”)

 
No. 07_03

De contractibus simulatis, 1460.

 
Manuscript

Padova, Bibl. Univ. n. provv. 275, fol. 118r–177r (Incipit: “Ciuis quidam Veronensis.” Explicit: “Et habetur in iuribus preallegatis.”)

 
 

Nürnberg, Stadtbibl. Cent.VI.7, fol. 229r–276r (Online. For the manuscript, see Text 04_3 and 09_6.)

 
No. 07_04

De interpretatione legis extensiva, 1469.

 
Manuscript

Milano, Bibl. Ambrosiana (scaffali ‘supra’), D.93 sup., fol. 41r–v

 
No. 07_05

De cognitione librorum iuris canonici, before 1468.

 
Manuscript

München, BSB Clm 14533, fol. 1[–8] (Catalogued as “Tractatus (‘Liber’) de cognitione iuris pontificii ad Nicolaum Donatum Venetum.” B. is noted as ‘advocatus consistorialis’.)

 
 

Bern, Burgerbibl. 490 (no. 14,7 fol.) (Catalogued as: “Tractatus de cognitione iuris pontificii ad Nicolaum Donatum Venetum.” Colophon: “Finis xiiii. Januarii anno a nativitate domini m.cccc.lxviii. in Perusio.”)

 
 

Innsbruck, Ferdinandeum F.B. 128, fol. 59v–67v, 77v–79v (Catalogued as “Tractatus de cognitione iuris pontificii ad Nicolaum Donatum Venetum : excerpta(?)”. Incipit: ”Sunt nonnulli, reuerende pater, qui sacrorum canonum scientiam.” Explicit: “aliter ideo de ipsis nihil dicendum putaui.”)

 
No. 07_06

De imperatore militum deligendo, c. 1454.

 
Manuscript

Nürnberg, Stadtbibl. Cent.VI.7, fol. 279r–330v (Online. For the manuscript, see Text 04_3 and 09_6. At the end of the treatise (fol. 329r) there is letter of thanks from Georgius de Larisio to B. dated on fol. 330v Verona, 3 April 1454.)

 
No. 08_01

Libellus de dolore tolerando, 1466–1467.

 
Manuscript

Città del Vaticano, BAV Vat. lat. 3574, fol. 1–13

 
No. 08_02

Verses addressed to Frederick III, 1446 X 1475.

 
Manuscript

Verona, BC 1393, fol. 164v–166r

 
No. 09_1

De praescriptionibus.

 
Manuscript

München, BSB Clm 6585 (On the basis of an old catalogue, Dolezalek reports this item under Clm 6568 and then reports the manuscript as lost. For some time, we had the same item under Clm 6585, a signature that Dolezalek does not use. (Perhaps the manuscript was not lost but renumbered.) Clm 6585 is now available online, and what was listed as, presumably, a tractatus De praescriptionibus would seem to be B’s lectura on portions of book 7 of the Codex that contain, among other things, the titles on prescription. We list it above under Text 01_2.)

 
No. 09_2

De praesumptionibus.

 
Manuscript

Nürnberg, Stadtbibl. Cent.IV.95, fol. 437-470v (Rubric: “Qualiter contractus ficticii praesumi possint.” We suspect that this is a version of Text 07_3, which begins with more than 20 presumptions. Unfortunately, the online version of the manuscript in BEIC does not seem to include these folios.)

 
No. 09_3

Ordo iudiciarius.

 
Manuscript

München, BSB Clm 14533 (On the basis of an old catalogue, Dolezalek reports that this manuscript contains an Ordo iudiciarius by B. It does contain an ordo, the Processus iudicii of Johannes Urbach. It also contains B’s De cognitione librorum iuris canonici (above, under Text 07_5), but the ordo by B. is a phantom.)

 
No. 09_4

Tractatus de testamentis.

 
Manuscript

Trier, Stadtbibl. 983/918, fol. 9-29 (Incipit: “Consueui pro hoc tempore.” Explicit: “Infra de appellationibus.” We suspect that this is a version of Text 03_2.)

 
No. 09_5

Tractatus de usucapione.

 
Manuscript

Verona, BC 91.5, fol. 143v-275v (Fol. 275v notes the death of B. on 10.v.1475. We suspect that this is a version of, or derived from, B’s lectura on Cod. 7.26 and following. See the notes on BSB clm 6585 under Text 01_2 and the Early Editions under this text.)

 
No. 09_6

Tractatus (without further description).

 
Manuscript

Nürnberg, Stadtbibl. Cent. VI.7 (There are two manuscripts so described in Dolezalek. The Nürnberg manuscript is available online. It contains three items the might be described as tractatus. They are listed above under Text 04_3, 07_3, and 07_6.)

 
 

Verona, Bibl. Cap. CCXLIX (220), fol. 72r-75v (The Verona manuscript is not available online, but there is a catalogue published in 1996 that was not available to Dolezalek. The catalogue gives a probable date for this part of the manuscript of 1465, a shelfmark, and a description of the item 4: Rubric: “Incipit tractatus domini Bertholomei Cepolle veronensis in materia quando domino equiparatur an sit bonum argumentum de uno ad aliud.” Incipit: “Quia saepe dubitatur quando domino.” We suspect that this is an extract from the Cautelae, but only an examination in situ would tell.)

 

Text(s) – Early Printed Editions

No. 02_1

Ad tit. De aedilicio edicto (Dig. 21.1), 1446.

 
Early Printed Editions

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 1–170 (online). Said to be the first printing. So far as we can tell that is correct.

 
No. 02_2

Ad tit. De verborum significatione (D.50.16), 1446 X 1475.

 
Early Printed Editions

Clariss. iurecons. Barptholomaei [sic] Caepolae Veronensis, In titulum de verborum et rer. significatione doctissima commentaria [Dig. 50.16]. Lyon, 1551.

 
 

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 456–663.

 
No. 03_1

In C. De fugitivis servis, Si fugitivi (C. 6.1.3), 1457.

 
Early Printed Editions

Brescia, 1490 (GW 6489) (IGI 2690) (online). The online edition by the BSB includes the 2 appendices with separate URNs; the second is B’s repetitio on C. 6.1.3.

 
 

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 707–735 (online).

 
No. 04

Cautelae advocatorum or Tractatus de cautelis.

 
Early Printed Editions

Examination of the items that are available online shows that there is considerable variation in those that are said to contain Parts 1 and 2. Four of the incunabula contain 325 numbered cautelae. Those that have the standard incipit and explicit for Parts 1 and 2 but contain fewer than 325 cautelae or do not seem to have enough pages for 325 cautelae are listed as of uncertain contents. There are probably more among those that we have listed for Parts 1 and 2 but have not been able to examine online. The fact that the Opera omnia contains only 257 numbered cautelae increases the possibility that the incunabula with 325 contain cautelae that are not by B., but there are other possibilities, including simple misnumbering.

 
No. 04_1

Part 1, 1459.

 
Early Printed Editions

Lyon, 1475 (GW 6480).

 
 

Leuven, 1476. We suspect that this citation is a mistake for GW 6481.

 
 

Leuven, 1486 (GW 6481) (online). 239 cautelae.

 
 

Leuven, 1487 (GW 6482) (online). 239 cautelae. Explicit: “Et hoc practici advocati bene faciunt”.

 
 

Antwerp, 1490 (GW 6483).

 
No. 04_2

Parts 1 and 2, 1459 and 1472.

 
Early Printed Editions

Perugia, 1473–1474 (GW 6474) (IGI 2685).

 
 

Milano, 1475 (GW 6475).

 
 

Roma, 1479 (GW 6476) (online). Cautelae unnumbered but the incipit and explicit match Parts 1 and 2.

 
 

Roma, 1480 (GW 6477) (online). Cautelae unnumbered but the incipit and explicit match Parts 1 and 2.

 
 

Pavia, 1480 (GW 6478).

 
 

Venezia, 1485 (GW 6479) (online). Cautelae unnumbered but the incipit and explicit match Parts 1 and 2.

 
 

Strassbourg, 1490 (GW 6484) (online). 325 cautelae.

 
 

Lyon, 1491 (GW 6485) (online). 325 cautelae.

 
 

Lyon, 1493–1494 (GW 6486) (online). 325 cautelae.

 
 

Lyon, 1495 (GW 6487).

 
 

Venezia, 1498. We suspect that this citation is a mistake for GW 6500.

 
 

Lyon, 1500 (GW 6488) (online). 325 cautelae.

 
 

Lyon, 1535.

 
 

Lyon, 1543.

 
 

Lyon, 1550.

 
 

Lyon, 1552.

 
 

Venezia, 1563.

 
 

Strasbourg, 1665.

 
No. 04_3

Contents uncertain, 1459 X 1472.

 
Early Printed Editions

Venezia, 1485 (GW 6499) (online). Interspersed between the urban and rustic servitudes is a collection of B’s cautelae. The incipit and explicit match the standard for Parts 1 and 2, but it does not looks as if there is enough room for 325 cautelae.

 
 

Venezia, 1488 (GW 6500) (online). Text 07_1: fol. [2r]–[40v]. Cautelae, unnumbered: fol. [42r]–[71v] Text 07_2: fol. [73r} (numbered in hand fol. 236) – fol. [112r }(fol. 275r in hand).Incipit and explicit suggest Text 04_2, but there does not seem to be enough space to contain them all.

 
 

Pavia, 1492 (GW 6504) (online). Cautelae: fol. [79]–[255]. Same incipit and explicit as Text 04_2, but only 255 numbered cautelae. Principle of selection unclear. Also contains Text 07_01, 07_02, and 07_03 with separate colophons.

 
 

Venezia, 1493 (GW 6502) (online). An edition of 255 of B’s cautelae is said to precede the two tracts on servitudes. In the online edition it follows urban servitudes, and rustic servitudes are not included. As in the case of GW 6504, the principle of selection of the cautelae is not clear.

 
 

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 745–836 (online). 257 cautelae.

 
No. 05

Consilia, 1446 X 1475.

 
Early Printed Editions

Consilia criminalia. Brescia, 1490 (GW 6489) (IGI 2690) (online). G. Rossi mistakenly describes this item as consilia civilia. The online edition by the BSB includes the 2 appendices with separate URNs, the first a tabula by B’s sons Michael and Leonardus (online), the second B’s repetitio on C. 6.1.3 (online).

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Milano, 1497 (GW 6490) (IGI 2691) (online). This edition has the tabula at the beginning and does not include the repetitio.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Milano, 1503.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Venezia, 1504.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Lyon, 1525.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Lyon, 1531.

 
 

Consilia civilia. Lyon, 1533. This is the first edition of the civilia that we have found.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Lyon, 1540.

 
 

Consilia civilia. Lyon, 1541.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Lyon, 1543.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Venezia, 1555.

 
 

Consilia civilia. Venezia, 1575.

 
 

Consilia criminalia. Venezia, 1575.

 
 

Consilia tam civilia quam criminalia. Frankfurt, 1599.

 
No. 06

Consiliorum Pauli de Castro editio, 1446 X 1475.

 
Early Printed Editions

Venezia, 1475 (IGI 7272).

 
No. 07_01

De servitutibus urbanorum praediorum, 1460–1461.

 
Early Printed Editions

Roma, 1473–1474 (GW 6493) (online). Online is only urban servitudes.

 
 

Perugia, c. 1473–1474 (GW 6494).

 
 

Milano, 1475 (GW 6495).

 
 

Roma, 1475 (GW 6496).

 
 

Roma, 1475 (GW 6497) (online). There are separate URNs for each part.

 
 

Pavia, 1481 (GW 6498). This edition was later combined with GW 6478 and 6509 and distributed in Pavia by the printer Francuscus Giardengus around 1490.

 
 

Venezia, 1485 (GW 6499) (online). Interspersed between the urban and rustic servitudes is a collection of B’s cautelae (https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb00049524-5).

 
 

Venezia, 1488 (GW 6500) (online). Text 07_1: fol. [2r]–[40v]. Cautelae, unnumbered: fol. [42r]-[71v]. Text 07_2: fol. [73r] (numbered in hand fol. 236) – fol. [112r] (fol. 275r in hand).

 
 

Pavia, 1492 (GW 6501) (online). There are separate URNs for each part.

 
 

Pavia, 1492 (GW 6504) (online). Contains Text 04_3, 07_01, 07_02, and 07_03 with separate colophons.

 
 

Venezia, 1493 (GW 6502) (online). An edition of 255 of B’s Cautelae is said to precede the two tracts on servitudes. In the online edition it follows urban servitudes, and rustic servitudes are not included.

 
 

Toulouse, c. 1496 (GW 6503).

 
 

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 171–276.

 
 

Tractatus universi iuris. Venezia: F. Ziletti, 1584, 6.2.209va.

 
 

Der in Stätten vnd auff dem Land gelegener Gebäw, auch Feldgüter, Dienstbarkheiten, sampt gründtlichem Bericht, wie in allen derowegen fürfallenden Irrungen . . . ; so dann De iure emphyteutico = Von Erbbeständnussen vnd Erbrechten. Strassbourg, 1596. P. Liver reports earlier editions of this German translation of the two tractatus: Straßburg, 1560 and 1568.

 
 

Tractatus de servitutibus, tam urbanorum, quàm rusticorum prædiorum. Accessit nunc primum Martini Laudensis I.C. Repetitio ad l. Seruitutes 14 ff. de Seruitutibus. Item D. Ioannis Superioris I. C. in singulas leges, quae sunt sub tit. ff. de Seruitutib. Commentarij succenturiati. Köln, 1616 (online). The Hathi Trust version of this item is miscatalogued. It does not contain works of Christian Tomasius or of Gottlieb Gerhard Titius, and the place of publication is Köln (Coloniae Agrippinae) not Genève (Coloniæ Allobragum).

 
 

Tractatus de servitutibus, tam urbanorum, quàm rusticorum prædiorum. Accedunt Martini Laud. & Jo: Superioris commentarii ad leges singulas de servitutibus: item, Antonii Mathæi disputationes VII de servitutibus; Et huic editioni, quæ in hactenus editis non habentur Gottliebi Gerhardi Titii de servitute faciendi et Christiani Thomasii de servitute stillicidii dissertationes. Lausanne et Genève, 1756 (online).

 
 

Trattato intorno le servitù tanto civili che rustiche. Bergamo, 1763, 2 vols.. Reprinted in Brescia in 1765, Venezia 1794. According to P. Liver, it formed the basis of a commentary on the relevant sections of the Austrian Civil Code in 1859.

 
No. 07_02

De servitutibus rusticorum praediorum, 1460–1461.

 
Early Printed Editions

Roma, 1473–1474 (GW 6493) (online). Online is only urban servitudes.

 
 

Perugia, c. 1473–1475 (GW 6494).

 
 

Milano, 1475 (GW 6495).

 
 

Roma, 1475 (GW 6496).

 
 

Roma, 1475 (GW 6497) (online). There are separate URNs for each part.

 
 

Pavia, 1481 (GW 6498). This edition was later combined with GW 6478 and 6509 and distributed in Pavia by the printer Francuscus Giardengus around 1490.

 
 

Venezia, 1485 (GW 6499) (online). Interspersed between the urban and rustic servitudes is a collection of B’s cautelae (https://nbn-resolving.org/urn:nbn:de:bvb:12-bsb00049524-5).

 
 

Venezia, 1488 (GW 6500) (online). Text 07_1: fol. [2r]–[40v]. Cautelae, unnumbered: fol. [42r]-[71v]. Text 07_2: fol. [73r] (numbered in hand fol. 236) – fol. [112r] (fol. 275r in hand).

 
 

Pavia, 1492 (GW 6501) (online). There are separate URNs for each part.

 
 

Pavia, 1492 (GW 6504) (online). Contains Text 04_3, 07_01, 07_02, and 07_03 with separate colophons.

 
 

Venezia, 1493 (GW 6502) (online). An edition of 255 of B's Cautelae is said to precede the two tracts on servitudes. In the online edition it follows urban servitudes, and rustic servitudes are not included. The fact, however, that GW has a complete description of rustic servitudes suggests that this particular online copy is deficient and bound in a different order from the usual.

 
 

Toulouse, c. 1496 (GW 6503).

 
 

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 276–386 (online).

 
 

Tractatus universi iuris. Venezia: F. Ziletti, 1584, 6.2.176vb.

 
 

Der in Stätten vnd auff dem Land gelegener Gebäw, auch Feldgüter, Dienstbarkheiten, sampt gründtlichem Bericht, wie in allen derowegen fürfallenden Irrungen . . . ; so dann De iure emphyteutico = Von Erbbeständnussen vnd Erbrechten. Strassbourg, 1596. P. Liver reports earlier editions of this German translation of the two tractatus: Straßburg, 1560 and 1568.

 
 

Tractatus de servitutibus, tam urbanorum, quàm rusticorum prædiorum. Accessit nunc primum Martini Laudensis I.C. Repetitio ad l. Seruitutes 14 ff. de Seruitutibus. Item D. Ioannis Superioris I. C. in singulas leges, quae sunt sub tit. ff. de Seruitutib. Commentarij succenturiati. Köln, 1616 (online). The Hathi Trust version of this item is miscatalogued. It does not contain works of Christian Tomasius or of Gottlieb Gerhard Titius, and the place of publication is Köln (Coloniae Agrippinae) not Genève (Coloniæ Allobragum).

 
 

Tractatus de servitutibus, tam urbanorum, quàm rusticorum prædiorum. Accedunt Martini Laud. & Jo: Superioris commentarii ad leges singulas de servitutibus: item, Antonii Mathæi disputationes VII de servitutibus; Et huic editioni, quæ in hactenus editis non habentur Gottliebi Gerhardi Titii de servitute faciendi et Christiani Thomasii de servitute stillicidii dissertationes. Lausanne et Genève, 1756 (online).

 
 

Trattato intorno le servitù tanto civili che rustiche. Bergamo, 1763, 2 vols.. Reprinted in Brescia in 1765, Venezia 1794. According to P. Liver, it formed the basis of a commentary in 1859 on the relevant sections of the Austrian Civil Code of 1812.

 
No. 07_03

De contractibus simulatis, 1460.

 
Early Printed Editions

Roma, 1474 (GW 6505) (online).

 
 

Milano, c. 1475 (GW 6506).

 
 

Roma, c. 1475 (GW 6507). Said to include a tractatus De renunciationibus, perhaps a subheading in the main work.

 
 

Albi, c. 1478 (GW 6508) (online). The BL dates to ?1480, and names the printer as Johann Neumeister rather than the printer of Aeneas Silvius.

 
 

Pavia, 1481 (GW 6509) (online).

 
 

Milano, 1492 (GW 6510) (online).

 
 

Pavia, 1492 (GW 6504) (online). Contains Text 04_3, 07_01, 07_02, and 07_03 with separate colophons.

 
 

Siena, 1493 (GW 6511) (online). Also available online at http://resolver.staatsbibliothek-berlin.de/SBB0002319F00000000.

 
 

Pavia, 1498 (GW 6512) (online).

 
 

Pavia, after 1498 (GW 651210N).

 
 

Opera omnia: De contractibus emptionum et locationum cum pacto de retrovertendo simulatis. Lyon, 1577–1578, 664–706 (online).

 
 

Tractatus universi iuris. Venezia: F. Ziletti, 1584, 7.2ra.

 
No. 07_04

De interpretatione legis extensiva, 1469.

 
Early Printed Editions

D. Bartholomaei Caepollae Veronensis iurisconsulti clariss. De interpretatione legis extensiua, vberrimus, ac vtilissimus tractatus. Necnon D. Matthaei Mathesilani Bononiensis J.V.D. celeberrimi alter eiusdem argumenti aureus tractatus. Venezia, 1557 (online). This is the only edition of this work in WorldCat or in Italian Edit16. The Tractatus extensionis of Matthaeus de Mathesilanis (d. 1412) occupies about 10 folios at the end of a 66 fol. work.

 
No. 07_05

De cognitione librorum iuris canonici, before 1468.

 
Early Printed Editions

Tractatus ex variis iuris interpretibus. Lyon, 1549, 1.184v-186r.

 
 

Opera omnia. Lyon, 1577–1578, 738–744 (online).

 
 

Tractatus universi iuris: De cognitione librorum iuris canonici. Venezia: F. Ziletti, 1584, 1.181va.

 
No. 07_06

De imperatore militum deligendo, c. 1454.

 
Early Printed Editions

Roma, 1474 (GW 6491) (online).

 
 

Roma, 1480 (GW 6492) (online).

 
 

Tractatus universi iuris. Venezia: F. Ziletti, 1584, 16.308rb.

 
No. 09_5

Tractatus de usucapione.

 
Early Printed Editions

Opera omnia: Tractatus de usucapione pro emptore, pro donato, pro dote, pro suo, pro soluto, pro legato, pro derelicto. Lyon, 1577–1578, 387–455 (online). Not said to be the first printing, but it is the only one that we have found. De usucapione pro emptore, pro donato, and pro dote are Cod. 7.26, 7.27, 7.28, respectively. The rest are not Codex titles as such, but they could well follow Cod. 7.29 (pro suo = pro herede in the modern ed.) and Cod. 7.30 (Communia de usucapionibus). These parallels tends to confirm the suggestion made in Manuscripts that this item is derived from B’s lectura on Cod. 7.

 
No. 09_6

Tractatus (without further description).

 
Early Printed Editions

De renunciationibus. Roma, c. 1475 (GW 6507). We suspect that this tractatus, is a subheading in the main work, Text 07_3.

 
 

Tractatus varii collecti. Lyon, after 1500 (Hain 4878) (GW 6 Sp.397a). Because it is no longer classified as an incunabulum, we will have to wait to determine its contents until some library starts putting its early 16th-century imprints online or until someone visits a library that holds it.

 
 

Tractatus varii collecti. Milano, 1503 (Hain 14868) (GW 6 Sp.397b). Previously mistakenly attributed to Bologna 1498. Because it is no longer classified as an incunabulum, we will have to wait to determine its contents until some library starts putting its early 16th-century imprints online or until someone visits a library that holds it.

 
No. 10

Opera omnia, 1446 X 1475.

 
Early Printed Editions

D. Bartholomaei Caepollae Veronensis iurisconsulti doctissimi et celeberrimi, Omnia quae quidem nunc extant opera. Lyon: Sumptibus Philippi Tinghi Florentini, 1577–1578, [12], 836, [84] pages; folio, double-column (online). The only such edition, so far as we are aware, to appear. The contents are analyzed above under their proper texts with the title Opera omnia. It is large book with comprehensive summaries and indices. It does not contain any of B’s consilia, and other works of his are also missing, but it does contain Text 02_1 and 09_5, which we have not found printed elsewhere. In addition to the works attributed to B., it contains “Tractatus D. Johannis Thierri I.U.D. totam materiam fugae Laconice complectens” (p. 735b-737a) (see Report t199), which is closely related to Text 03_1 which precedes it, and “Consilium D. Signoroli de Homeleis & Raphaelis Fulgosii Doctorum” (p. 737a–b), which has to do with decisory oaths, and was probably put in to fill out what would otherwise have been a blank column.

 

Literature

G. Rossi, ‘Cipolla (Caepolla, Cepola, Zevola), Bartolomeo (Bartholomaeus Veronensis)’, in DGI (2013) 1.547–549.

H. Lange and M. Kriechbaum, Kommentatoren 842–848.

Il giurista veronese Bartolomeo Cipolla (sec. XV). Documenti, manoscritti; libri a stampa, A. Contò and B. Maschietto, ed. (Verona 2004). (Not seen.)

A. Spagnolo, I Manoscritti della Biblioteca Capitolare di Verona, S. Marchi, ed. (Verona 1996) 283–284.

I. Baumgärtner, ‘Rechtsnorm und Rechtsanwendung in der venezianischen Terraferma des 15. Jahrhunderts: Die Consilia von Bartolomeo Cipolla’, Consilia im späten Mittelalter: Zum historischen Aussagewert einer Quellengattung, I. Baumgärtner, ed. (Studi: Schriftenreihe des Deutschen Studienzentrums in Venedig, 13; Sigmaringen 1995) 79–111.

D. Quaglioni, ‘Gli ebrei nei consilia del Quattrocento veneto’, Consilia im späten Mittelalter: Zum historischen Aussagewert einer Quellengattung, I. Baumgärtner, ed. (Studi: Schriftenreihe des Deutschen Studienzentrums in Venedig, 13; Sigmaringen 1995) 189–204.

A. Belloni, Professori giuristi 153–61.

F. Todescan, ‘Logica e scientia iuris a Padova nel Quattrocento. Il De interpretatione legis extensiva di Bartolomeo Cepolla’, Scienza e filosofia all’Università di Padova nel Quattrocento, A. Poppi, ed. (Centro per la storia dell’Università di Padova, 1; Trieste 1983) 463–489.

P. Liver, ‘Die vom 15. bis 19. Jahrhundert meistgedruckte juristische Monographie: Bartholomaei Caepolae Veronensis i. c. clarissimi Tractatus de servitutibus tam urbanorum quam rusticorum praediorum, 1473–1859’, ZRG Rom. Abt., 99 (1982) 326–31.

O. Ruffino, ‘Cipolla (Caepolla, Cepola, Cepolla, Cevola, Zevola), Bartolomeo (Bartolomeo da Verona, Bartholomaeus Veronensis)’, in DBI (1981) 25709–13 (online).

A. Mazzacane, ‘Lo Stato e il dominio nei giuristi veneti durante il “secolo della terraferma”’, Storia della cultura veneta III: Dal primo Quattrocento al Concilio di Trento, G. Arnaldi and M. Pastore, ed. (Vicenza 1980) 595–605.

C. Bukowska Gorgoni, ‘Eine Studie zur Arbeitsmethode der italienischen Juristen des XV. Jahrhunderts: Die Traktate von Martinus Laudensis “De dignitate” und Bartholomeus Cepolla “De imperatore militum deligendo”’, Ius commune, 7 (1978) 50–80.

J. Bonet Correa, ‘La constitución tacita de las servidumbres en el Derecho común’, AHDE, 37 (1967) 531–551.

A. Sartori, ‘Documenti padovani sull’arte della stampa nel sec. XV’, Libri e stampatori in Padova, Miscellanea di studi in onore di Giuseppe Bellini, tipografo, editore, libraio (Padova 1959) 11–231.

B. Brugi, ‘Cipolla Bartolomeo’, Enciclopedia italiana (1931) 10.386–87.