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Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Medieval and Early Modern Jurists

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Report No. t157

Gulielmus Hannetonius

1506–1586

 

Alternative Names

Haneton, Guillaume; Hannetonius, Wilhelm

 

Biography/Description

Born in 1506 in or near Lille, G. was the son of a cloth merchant of Tournai. He studied at Leuven but apparently did not teach there. He is said to have taught feudal law for a brief period at Bourges, but the sources of that information are questionable. In 1537, he returned to Tournai, where he worked as a lawyer and magistrate in various public capacities in the city until his death in 1586.

Given the limitations of our current knowledge, an assessment of G.’s work seems premature, but he probably deserves more attention than modern scholarship has paid to him. There seems little reason to doubt that he wrote two works: De iure feudorum and De ordine et forma iudiciorum. The 1647 edition of the former asserts that it is the source of Éguiner Baron’s De beneficiis. At first glance, G.’s and Baron’s works appear quite different, but a detailed comparison has not yet been undertaken, much less an overall assessment of G.’s contribution to the literature on feudal law. It does seem likely that G.’s De ordine et forma iudiciorum was a, if not the, source of an ordo written in German by Justinus Göbler that enjoyed many printings.

Source: Emilie Varenbergh in the Biografie nationale de la Belgique, 8.684–686. Despite its age and its reliance on an even older source (Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire littéraire des dix-sept provinces des pays-bas, de la principauté de Liège, et de quelques contrées voisines), there is no reason to doubt the basic biographical details given there.

 

Text(s)

 
No. 01

De ordine et forma iudiciorum, 1543–?1570. In 1543, the Frankfurt publisher Christian Egenolff published what is said to be the first edition of a work called Tractatus de ordine & forma Judiciorum, attributed to G. In 1555, Egenolff, published a work entitled Gerichtlichen Proceß vornembste Hauptpuncten vnnd Artickel Durch den Hochgelerten Herrn Wilhelmen Hannetonium Rechtsleerern erstlich in Latein beschriben vñ nachfolgend durch Herrn Justin Gobler der Rechten Doctor in gemeyn Teutsche spraach verwandelt. This would seem to be, as the title implies, a translation by Justinus Göbler of the 1543 printing of the De ordine et forma iudiciorum. Also in 1555, Egenolff published another work entitled Gerichtliche Proceß, Auß geschribenen Rechten, vnd nach Gemeinem, im Heyligen Reich teutscher Nation gebrauch, vnd vbung: Erstlich die Practick Gerichtlicher Terminen . . . Zum andern, die Theorica, mit Erklärung viler guten Doctrinen, which is attributed to Justinus Göbler. This latter work enjoyed considerable success and was reprinted a number of times. That it was derived from G.’s earlier work seems clear; whether it a mere translation or a reworking requires more investigation. G.’s work, once more in Latin, was published in Douai by Louis de Winde in 1570; again in Köln in 1584 with de Winde’s preface; again in Speyer in 1591 with a different preface; and yet again, for what seems to be the last time, in Köln in 1604. The preface to this final printing, purportedly written by G. (who had been dead for 18 years at the time of publication), claims that the Egenolff edition (without a date, but that of 1543 is probably meant) was a pirate. This could be true, but must be greeted with some skepticism. Since we have three editions of the work that appeared in G.’s lifetime, a comparison among the three is possible, although it has not yet been undertaken. If it turns out that the 1570 edition was a substantial improvement of that of 1543 that would give some plausibility to the claim that the 1543 edition was a pirate.

 
No. 02

Tractatus de iure feudorum in libros quatuor distinctos, 1564. The catalogue of the Harvard University Library, alone among the libraries that catalogue this work, mistakenly attributes it to Justinus Göbler. The first edition seems to have been published without G’s participation in 1564; Johann Havinchorst’s preface says as much. What Havinchorst published is not an outstanding example of the printer’s craft, and unfortunately the TUI edition is basically a reprint of it. Valère André’s preface to the final edition of 1647 asserts that his edition contains not only additions by Paul Christinen and André himself, but also corrections by G. This, however, cannot be proven from an edition that appeared so long after G.’s death. André’s preface also asserts that G.’s De iure feudorum is the source of Éguiner Baron’s De beneficiis. This is possible, but needs to be verified. Even if it turns out that the two works bear some similarities, the influence may run the other way: Baron’s work was first published in 1549, while the De iure feudorum did not appear until 1564.

 

Text(s) – Early Printed Editions

No. 01

De ordine et forma iudiciorum, 1543–?1570.

 
Early Printed Editions

Tractatus de ordine & forma Judiciorum. Christian Egenolff: Frankfurt 1543

 
 

Gerichtlichen Proceß vornembste Hauptpuncten vnnd Artickel Durch den Hochgelerten Herrn Wilhelmen Hannetonium Rechtsleerern erstlich in Latein beschriben vñ nachfolgend durch Herrn Justin Gobler der Rechten Doctor in gemeyn Teutsche spraach verwandelt. Justinus Göbler, Christian Egenolff: Frankfurt 1555. This would seem to be a translation by Göbler of G.’s De ordine et forma iudiciorum into German. What its relationship is to Göbler’s Gerichtliche Proceß, Auß geschribenen Rechten, vnd nach Gemeinem, im Heyligen Reich teutscher Nation gebrauch, vnd vbung: Erstlich die Practick Gerichtlicher Terminen . . . Zum andern, die Theorica, mit Erklärung viler guten Doctrinen, published by Egenolff in the same year, requires more investigation.

 
 

Tractatus de ordine et forma iudiciorum. Louis de Winde: Douai 1570

 
 

Tractatus de ordine et forma iudiciorum. Louis de Winde: Köln 1584

 
 

Tractatus de ordine et forma iudiciorum. Speyer 1590

 
 

Tractatus de ordine et forma iudiciorum. Balthasarus Clypeus: Köln 1604. Contains a preface purportedly by H. in which the author claims that the Egenolff edition (without a date, but that of 1543 is probably meant) was a pirate.

 
No. 02

Tractatus de iure feudorum in libros quatuor distinctos, 1564.

 
Early Printed Editions

De iure feudorum Guliel. Hannetonij libri quatuor. Johann Havinchorst: Köln 1564. There are also examples that bear the imprint date of 1565, but they seem to be otherwise unchanged.

 
 

Tractatus universi iuris. F. Ziletti: Venezia 1584, 10.1.162vb

 
 

De iure feudorum Guliel. Hannetonij libri quatuor. Valère André: Leuven 1647

 

Literature

E. Varenbergh, ‘Haneton, Guillaume’, in Biografie nationale de la Belgique (Bruxelles 1866) 8.684–68.

‘Guillaume Haneton’, in Mémoires pour servir à l'histoire littéraire des dix-sept provinces des pays-bas, de la principauté de Liège, et de quelques contrées voisines (Louvain 1770) 3.522-523.