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Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Medieval and Early Modern Jurists

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Report No. r134

Bonifacius Ammannati

fl. late 14th c.

 

Alternative Names

Bonifacio degli Ammannati; Bonifazio Ammannati

 

Biography/Description

Bonifacius Ammannati studied law at Padua around 1370. Later on, he returned to his native city, Avignon, to teach. The Avignonese popes of called upon him to serve in political missions. In 1397 he was made cardinal, despite the fact was a layman. He died in prison at Aigues Mortes in 1399. His extensive Lectura on the Clementines had only a limited circulation, and, when it was finally printed in 1522, it appeared under the spurious name of Bonifacius Vitalini.

 

Text(s)

 
No. 1

Lectura Clementinarum.

 
No. 2

Consilia. See D. Maffei [1980] 248 n.28.

 
No. 3

Questiones disputatae coram rege Castellae, 1381. These questiones were drafted for the dispute between Clement VII and Urban VI during the Schism.

 
No. 4

Questio. A small treatise on whether a son entering into religious orders can obtain succeed to an inheritance along with his brothers. Brun ascribes this treatise to Bonifacius.

 

Text(s) – Manuscripts

No. 1

Lectura Clementinarum.

 
Manuscript

Toledo, Arch. Cap. 23–1

 
No. 3

Questiones disputatae coram rege Castellae, 1381.

 
Manuscript

Paris, BN lat. 1469, fol. 143v

 
 

Paris, BN lat. 1470, fol. 104–125, 144–148

 
No. 4

Questio.

 
Manuscript

Paris, BN lat. 4591 (This treatise is the last [25th] item in the manuscript.)

 

Text(s) – Early Printed Editions

No. 1

Lectura Clementinarum.

 
Early Printed Editions

Lectura Clementinarum. Lyon, 1522.

 
 

Lectura Clementinarum. Venezia, 1574.

 

Literature

D. Maffei, ‘Profilo di Bonifacio Ammannati giurista e cardinale’, Genèse et débuts du grand schisme d’occident (Bibliotheca eruditorum 1; Paris 1980) 239–51.

R. Manselli, ‘Ammannati, Bonifazio’, in DBI (1960) 2.801–02 (online).

R. Brun, ‘Un bibliophile Italien a la cour pontificale d’Avignon: Boniface Ammanati’, Humanisme et Renaissance, 2 (1935) 216–33.