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Bio-Bibliographical Guide to Medieval and Early Modern Jurists

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Report No. a269

Honorius III

pope 1216–1226

 

Alternative Names

Honorius III, Pope (LC); Cencio Savelli

 

Biography/Description

Commissioned Tancred, then the leading canonist at Bologna, to compile a collection of his decretals. This became the Compilatio quinta, the last of the Compilationes antiquae and which was sanctioned for use in courts and in teaching in the bull Noue causarum (2 May 1226). Known especially for the decretal Super speculam, which restricted the study of Roman law among clerics. Like a number of very long decretals, Super speculam circulated as a separate text.

 

Text(s)

 
No. 1

Compilatio quinta. See under Compilatio quinta.

 
No. 2

Super Speculam.

 

Text(s) – Manuscripts

No. 2

Super Speculam.

 
Manuscript

Appended to Compilatio quarta

 
 

Córdoba, Bibl. Cabildo 10, fol. 305va–306va

 
 

Beaune, BM 19, fol. 295v (shortened)

 
 

Bamberg, Staatsbibl. Can. 19, fol. 77va–78vb (shortened)

 
 

Firenze, Bibl. Laurenz. Plut. 5 (olim S. Croce V) sin.4 (shortened; the library currently identifies this manuscript with the Plutei designation, but the literature often refers to it with the S. Croce one.)

 
 

Paris, BN lat. 14321, fol. 241

 
 

Rouen, BM 706, fol. 298v

 
 

Appended to Compilatio tertia

 
 

Lisboa, BN Alcobaça 381, fol. 224 (shortened)

 
 

Appended to the Constitutiones concilii Lateranensis quarti

 
 

Wien, ÖNB 2183, fol. 106–108 ( 5 Comp. 5.2.1, X 5.5.5, X 3.50.10, and X 5.33.28)

 

Literature

Bullarium Hellenicum: Pope Honorius III’s Letters to Frankish Greece and Constantinople, ed. W. Duba (Mediterranean Nexus 1100–1700 3; Turnhout 2015).

T. Smith, ‘Between Two Kings: Pope Honorius III and the Seizure of the Kingdom of Jerusalem by Frederick II in 1225’, Journal of Medieval History, 41 (2015) 41–59.

J. Brundage, ‘The Teaching and Study of Canon Law in the Law Schools’, in The History of Medieval Canon Law in the Classical Period, 1140–1234: From Gratian to the Decretals of Pope Gregory IX, W. Hartmann and K. Pennington, ed. (History of Medieval Canon Law 6; Washington DC 2008) 101–2, 108, 111.

K. Pennington, ‘The Decretalists 1190–1234’ and ‘Decretal Collections 1190–1234’, in The History of Medieval Canon Law in the Classical Period, 1140–1234: From Gratian to the Decretals of Pope Gregory IX, W. Hartmann and K. Pennington, ed. (History of Medieval Canon Law 6; Washington DC 2008) 236–37, 239, 242–43, 316–17.

L. Kéry, Gottesfurcht und irdische Strafe: Der Beitrag des mittelalterlichen Kirchenrechts zur Entstehung des öffentlichen Strafrechts (Konflikt, Verbrechen und Sanktion in der Gesellschaft Alteuropas, Symposien und Synthesen 10; Köln 2006) 481, 571, 583, 627–33, 655, 662.

U.–R. Blumenthal, ‘Papal Registers in the Twelfth Century’, in Proceedings Cambridge, P. Linehan, ed. (MIC C–8; Città del Vaticano 1988) 136, 138, 141.

S. Kuttner, ‘Retractationes X’, in Gratian and the Schools of Law 1140–1234 (London 1983) 43–47.

L. Boyle, ‘The Compilatio quinta and the registers of Honorius III’, BMCL, 8 (1978) 9–19.

E. Pitz, Papstreskript und Kaiserreskript im Mittelalter (Bibliotek des Deutschen Historischen Instituts in Rom 36; Tübingen 1971) 171–91.

S. Kuttner, ‘Papst Honorius III und das Studium des Zivilrechts’, in Festschrift für Martin Wolf (Tübingen 1951) 79–101.

W. Ullmann, ‘Honorius III and the Prohibition of Legal Studies’, Juridical Review, 60 (1948) 177–86.

S. Kuttner, Repertorium 382.